University of Illinois Extension

Illini Farm Report

 

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clicking on any slug line will download an mp3 file of the complete story

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Illini Farm Report

Todd E. Gleason

1301 W. Gregory Dr., Rm 75 MC710

Urbana, Illinois 61801

217-333-9697 or ifr@illinois.edu

 

October 17, 2014

 

Dear Broadcaster:

 

The Illini Farm Report is for use in your agricultural radio programming slots. You are welcome to run each story "as is," or to lift actualities from it. For your editing convenience, the scripts used for each story are included in this document. If you have any problems with the audio, story ideas, or suggestions for improvements, please call me at 217-3339697.

 

1          How Many Corn Acres in 2015

 

2          TBD

 

3          TBD

 

4          Farm Safety:  Wait for the Professionals

 

5          Farm Safety:  Risk of Electrocution

 

The opinions expressed on the Illini Farm Report are not necessarily those of the program producer, the University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences or U of I Extension. Our programs feature a wide range of viewpoints in the interest of promoting awareness and discussion of issues that are important to the agricultural community.

 



CUT 1 How Many Corn Acres in 2015

Darrel Good, Ag Economist – University of Illinois

 

If corn farmers want a breakeven price for their crop next year, theyŐll need to plant fewer acres of it. Todd Gleason has more on how one ag economist has forward figured the number of corn acres needed in 2015 to push cash prices back above four dollars a bushels.

 

The calculations are complicated, and continually evolvingÉ

3:04

 

The calculations are complicated, and continually evolving, but possible to do. One way to approach the question of how many corn acres are needed in 2015 is to determine the combination of production, consumption, and year-ending stocks that would result in a 2015-16 marketing year average farm price closer to the cost of production. ThatŐs estimated to be in the low $4.00 range (assuming trend yields) in much of the Corn Belt and requires a stocks to use ratio (a combination of all the factors just listed) of about twelve percent says University of Illinois Ag Economist Darrel Good.

 

 Good :46  If we look forward to sayÉ

Éabout two-point-six million less than we planted this year.

 

Again, in order to get to a twelve percent stocks to use ratio and more importantly a cash price for corn somewhere just north of $4.00, U.S. farmers would need to plant about 88 million acres. This is certainly possible. The number is roughly what U.S. farmers planted to corn in 2010. However, the dilemma is that reducing the number of corn acres usually means those acres planted to either wheat or soybeanÉand there isnŐt any real call for more bushels of either of those crops.

 

Good :42  You know that is the dilemma right nowÉ

Éof those two crops either.

 

U.S. wheat stocks are expected to increase during the current marketing year and a trend yield in 2015 would result in a larger crop than produced this year with no increase in acreage.  A trend soybean yield in 2015 would result in a smaller crop than produced this year, but production would still exceed the projection of use during the current marketing year.  It may be, thinks Darrel Good, that low prices will result in some decline in total crop acres in 2015.

 


 


 

CUT 4 Farm Safety:  Wait for the Professionals

Bob Aherin, Extension Farm Safety Specialist – University of Illinois

 

Farmers and ranchers should take care during the harvest season. Todd Gleason has more on one of the nationŐs most dangerous jobs and what the first person on the scene of a farm accident should not do.

 

Last year there were some 80,000 farm relatedÉ

2:53

 

Each year there are some 80,000 farm related injuries around the nation. Most of the time these injuries involved machinery. Usually a hand, an arm, a foot or leg was caught up in a fast moving tool. University of Illinois Extension Farm Safety Specialist Bob Aherin says itŐs a common accident and one were it best to leave the victim in place and wait for the first responders.

 

Aherin :33  A lot of our extremity accidents are toÉ

Éto deal with a person who is in that situation.

 

Once the victim is freed, Aherin says they can quickly lose blood and go into shock. It is important for the first person on the scene to shut down and stabilize the equipment, call an emergency crew, and then wait for them to make a decision about how to best proceed with the extraction.

 

Aherin :37  Another issue we have on farms this time of year is childrenÉ

Ébefore you can stop it.

 

Bob Aherin is always concerned about farm kids during the harvest season. He has know doubt the pressure to bring in the crop will cause moms and dads to ask too much of their offspring too soon.

 

Aherin :39   This year it could happenÉ

É13 and 15 or 16 years of age.

 

On the subject of kidsÉthe younger ones will play in the gravity flow wagons. ItŐs easy to get stuck, sucked down, and suffocated as those wagons empty. DonŐt let that happen.


 


 

CUT 5 Farm Safety:  Risk of Electrocution

Bob Aherin, Extension Farm Safety Specialist – University of Illinois

            http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/PM1265K.pdf

 

Farmers and ranchers should take care during the harvest season. Todd Gleason has more on the nationŐs most dangerous job and the risk of electrocution.

 

The stats say about 60 farm workers will be electrocutedÉ

2:52

 

The stats say about 60 farm workers will be electrocuted by accident this year. Most of them will be handling equipment; anything from a long ladder to a grain auger. The point of contact, says University of Illinois Extension Farm Safety Specialist Bob Aherin, is normally an overhead powerline.

 

Aherin 1:08  The most common accident is where we are movingÉ

Éthey are going to be electrocuted.

 

Many types of farm equipment can come in contact with overhead power lines. Tractors with front-end loaders, portable grain augers, fold-up cultivators, and equipment with antennas easily can become an electrical hazard and must be operated with care.

 

When contact is made the operator sometimes safely gets off the machine. This can only happen if the overhead line is dead, or the operator doesnŐt touch the machine and the ground when exiting. Sometimes they make the mistake of feeling safe and return to the machine. It is a deadly mistake if the overhead powerline is live.

 

If your tractor comes in contact with overhead power lines, stay on the tractor. Ask someone to contact the local utility company immediately to remove the danger. If there's an emergency, such as an electrical fire, and you need to leave the equipment, jump as far away from the equipment as possible. Do not allow any part of your body to touch the equipment and the ground at the same time.

 

Once you get away from the equipment, never attempt to get back on or even touch the equipment. Many electrocutions occur when the operator dismounts and, realizing nothing has happened, tries to get back on the equipment. The best way to handle emergencies is by prevention. Respect electricity and avoid contact with overhead lines.